Rescue Horse Adopted: Dusty

This horse was abandoned and alone. True Blue Animal Rescue took him in so he could get the vet care he needed and go into a foster home. This week his foster Mom decided he was meant to be there forever and adopted him! Hooray for Dusty and his new Mom, Jenni. If you’d like to adopt go towww.t-bar.org and take a look at the horses we have for adoption and consider our Foster to Adopt option.

TBAR Rescue Horse: Guy

Meet TBARs newest horse, Guy. He was found homeless in Washington Co and when nobody claimed him the options were to either send him to auction which would most likely end with slaughter or try and find him a home. His time is running out but we haven’t given up yet. Help us keep this one out of the kill pens! If anyone is looking for a sweet, young horse that would make a great pasture pet or horse to train to ride, email help@t-bar.org or call 936-878-2349.

UPDATE: Foster home found!

Rescue Dog: Stella

One of our wonderful foster homes went to Brenham Animal Services to volunteer and bring some donations. While she was there she met this beautiful dog named Stella. Poor Stella had some tumors on her side and belly, she was heart worm positive and she’s not a young dog so her chances for adoption were non existent. Shelli took pictures and together we tried to network for a foster home. Shelli already has a house full of pets and knew it would be a challenge to take her home but when nobody offered to foster or adopt Stella she decided to go back and get her and do the rehabilitation so she’d be healthy and have a better chance of being adopted. 

Here’s Stella now. She’s spayed, on heart worm treatment and her tumors have been removed. As soon as we get the results of the biopsies and she’s fully healed she’ll go up for adoption. Thank you for saving a life Shelli. This may not make a difference for all the dogs but for this one dog, it made ALL the difference. Save a life, foster or adopt.
www.t-bar.org

UPDATE: Stella’s tumors were benign except one and Dr. Philips got all of that one out so she is cancer free and will go up for adoption soon!!

More dog adoptions March 1

A couple more adoptions were finalized this week. Connie realized that Nettie was home all along when she decided to adopt this sweet foster dog and Cheryl finalized her adoption for Ali this week too! These two didn’t have to go anywhere, they were home all along! Adopt don’t shop! www.t-bar.org

Dog Success Stories: March 1

A few more of our adult dogs were adopted this week! Cookie went home with the family that met her at the chili cookoff. Missy got a great home with a family that has 14 acres for her to run on and Benny is going to be companion to the couple in the picture with him. All three went off happily with their new family as if it was meant to be. Foster homes are just holding them till their person finds them and nothing makes us happier than to see them go home! If you’re considering adoption see if your dog, cat or horse is on our website www.t-bar.organd then call and let us know so we can put you together! ?
936-878-2349

Lily adoption update

Adoptive family update!ia We announced Lily’s adoption last week and were thrilled to see this picture of her with her new family. Thanks for adopting! If you’d like to see our puppies, dogs, cats or horses that are up for adoption go to www.t-bar.org and then email help@t-bar.org for more information on how to adopt.

Adopted Puppy Feb 22

The first one of our new puppies is adopted!! We still have 6 more of these medium / small breed puppies looking for a forever home. If you’d like to see them go to www.t-bar.org and then email help@t-bar.org if you’d like to adopt. Please share.

TBAR Rescue Horse: Ginger

Ginger was caught up in a fence wire that cut her belly open in several places. Thanks to some fast acting rescuers who got her to the vet to be stitched up she’s healing and doing better. She’ll be at the vet for another week to be monitored while her injuries begin to heal before she takes another trailer ride. The owner could not keep her so True Blue Animal Rescue committed to rehabilitating her but we need your help to pay the vet bills. Go to our website and make a donation to help Ginger. Make a note to let us know that your donation is for Ginger’s vet bill. www.t-bar.org

Roman Update March 2015: Switch your Senior Animal to Senior Food

True-Blue-Animal-Rescue-Triple-Crown-Nutrition-Roman-Update-March-2015-2Roman is doing great on Triple Crown Senior!

Roman has now been on Triple Crown Senior feed for 5 weeks now and is showing great improvement. With all of the recent rainy weather, he has enjoyed rolling and getting all muddy. His foster home is suspicious that he does it on purpose because he knows he’ll get brushed afterwards and he enjoys all of the love and attention!

Since Roman is so large, and also so malnourished, he is fed a bit more than the recommended 6 pounds of senior feed per day (half in the morning, half at night). He is benefiting from the higher nutrient content to make up for his older (and less efficient) digestive system. Triple Crown Senior has a higher fat content for extra energy, enough bulk fiber to make up for any lack of hay or grass, and it is also softer, which makes it easier on Roman’s system. In addition to his Triple Crown Senior feed, Roman is also given quality hay, access to pasture grass and clean, fresh water.

Roman is doing great, but in honor of him, and every other animal in his situation, we’d like to take a moment to explain what you need to watch out for, and what you can do to help your horse as they get older! Before Roman got to the state he was in, he could have been identified as malnourished by early weight loss, topline muscle loss, graying of the coat, and hollowing of the grooves around his eyes, as well as decreased hoof and hair coat quality. The following three things should be done for each aging horse, to ensure they have the best quality of life in their senior years.

Teeth Floating

The tool used to smooth down your horse’s teeth is a file, called a float (hence the term, teeth floating). Horse teeth never stop growing, and over time they can become sharp and uneven or fractured, making it hard for them to chew and even causing discomfort and pain. In this situation it is hard for your horse to eat feed, grass, and hay, and you may notice quids around their eating area. Quidding is when your horse tries to eat hay, but can’t properly chew and swallow it, so they essentially just wad it up in their mouth and spit it out, leaving behind quids on the ground as evidence of the teeth issues.

You can feed your senior horse a mix of senior feed and water to make a mash that is easy for them to swallow and digest while you are waiting to get their teeth floated.

Get Bloodwork done

As horses age they become at risk for metabolic issues, such as Cushings. If your horse has hormone imbalances, or organ failure, the only way to tell for sure is to get bloodwork done by your veterinarian. When you are caring for your senior pets, bloodwork is an essential step before you simply switch them to senior feed and assume all will be well.

Switch Your Horse to Senior Feed

Giving your older horse more of the same feed isn’t the answer. The feed just goes through them without the proper digestion and nutrient absorption. Proof of this can be seen if you examine your horses manure and see undigested grain.

Senior feed is softer, making it more easily digestible, and it is also specially formulated with high-quality ingredients to make up for your senior horse’s decreased ability for nutrient absorption and digestion.

As your horse ages their bodies are less able to break down their food into the essential elements that they need for proper nutrition. Senior feed has extra high-quality vitamins and minerals, such as protein, fiber, and phosphorus, and calcium, which is easier for your senior horse’s body to process. Senior feed has high quality nutrients for better absorption, added vitamins for the immune system, and pre- and pro-biotics to help with digestive efficiency and overall health.

When is Your Horse a Senior?

Generally, 15 years and older is considered a senior horse, but it varies for each animal. The best person to advise you on what is best for your horse’s health is your veterinarian.